Curtiss P-36 Hawk, 1940-41

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We see a rather rare photo here: a pre-war P-36 sporting a bare metal finish with national insignia on its fuselage. Perhaps this can be explained by the fact that in late 1940, the Air Corps was conducting experiments with camouflage as well as the placement of the national insignia. This P-36 is assigned to Maxwell Field’s 23rd Composite Group – the unit that carried out such testing.

Junior Birdmen of 1959

These shots were taken at Graham Air Base, Florida, in the latter half of 1959. The aircraft are the T-34 and, of course, the then new T-37 “Tweet”. Graham was an air force training base, but was operated primarily by civilian contractors and not air force personnel. As such, it did not carry the title “Air Force Base”. By 1959, the era of civilian operated training schools was coming to a close, and Graham Air Base closed the following year.

The Vickers Valiant

The VC-137A & B

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58-6960 sports the VC-137’s original markings on an early test flight prior to its delivery to the USAF.
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58-6970 cruises the skies of Western Washington in the late 50s. It is now at the Museum of Flight in Seatle.
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62-6000 undergoes final checks prior to delivery.
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62-6000 takes to the skies.
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62-6000 is, of course, the most famous of the Air Force Ones. It was this aircraft President Kennedy flew to Dallas in 1963. The plane is now at the Air Force Museum.