27th Pursuit Squadron, 1939

Webp.net-resizeimage (3)Sporting some rather bizarre camouflage paint schemes, P-36 Hawks of Selfridge Field’s 27th Pursuit do some fancy flying for the camera. Contrary to popular belief, the camo paint was not part of some war game exercise but rather for display – the 1939 National Air Races in Cleveland, Ohio. In theory, the water-based paint could be easily removed. In practice, that was not quite so: broad areas were washed clean, but the paint adhered itself into every panel seam and rivet head.

Fast forward: In the early 1980s, a pair of A-10s from my base in Alaska were given a water-based “Arctic white” paint job over their normal dark green. Used only for a one week exercise, the white paint was then given a rinse. Same results as in 1939. Every place that was not a smooth flat surface had white paint clinging to it. Every panel, rivet, and screw head was highlighted making for two hideous-looking A-10s. Eyesores that they were, the two aircraft were parked together at the far end of the ramp.

 

Oddball Aircraft

 

 

“General Gilmore & Staff”, 1930

Webp.net-resizeimage (2)General Gilmore was Chief of the Air Corp’s Material Division where, naturally, he had a trusty staff to make things easier. That staff included Captains Frank Andrews and Laurence Kuter, and Major Henry Arnold. These men would achieve three, four, and five-star rank in the coming years. All of the men in this photo are wearing mourning bands but I am unable to ascertain who it was that died. The location of the photo is Wright Field, the aircraft, a Curtiss B-2 Condor of the 96th Bomb Squadron.

124th Fighter Squadron, Iowa Air National Guard, 1951

The year 1951 was busy for the Iowa Air National Guard at Des Moines Airport. At the beginning of that year the boys had been flying F-84 Thunderjets, but with the Korean War now in full-swing those F-84s went to active duty units while Iowa reverted to the F-51. Having flown them from 1946-1949, the 124th and the Mustang were old friends. This state of affairs continued until the war ended thus making jets available once again.