Inland Aviation

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Inland Aviation of Kansas was only around a few years, but they built some excellent aircraft such as the Inland Sport seen here.  One of its principal features was side-by-side seating.  You knew the modern age had arrived when whatever it was you invented for transporting people from one place to another gained the ability for two of those people to sit side-by-side.  Apparently, sitting next to your sweetie also keeps one’s hair in place — even when you’re going so fast blurry lines indicating speed are emanating from your windscreen.

By the time this ad ran in 1941, the Boeing 314 had been in service for two years, and things were doing so well it was time for more Clippers

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Years ago, I knew a man who had twice been a passenger on the 314.  Of course it was the most luxurious flight imaginable, but he also said it was much noisier than he expected.  Bumpy too.  Makes sense though: it was unpressurized and had to fly low. 

A pair of small posters announcing big news in 1930.  Meet me in St. Louis at the World Air Fair, the International Aircraft Exposition. There’s also the All-American Airshow in Detroit.  Added bonus: you only have to wait six weeks between the two shows.Webp.net-resizeimage (11)Webp.net-resizeimage (22)